The american book of the dead henry baum

the american book of the dead henry baum

J.M. Dent & Sons Ltd, London(Good condition, Hard cover) Rs. /- SOLD; uitgaan.nu – Danger from . Mindoro Folktales: The Journal of American Folklore (Good condition, Hardcover) Rs. /-; Gibran Kahlil. . The Naked and the Dead. . (Fair condition,Soft cover) Rs. /-; Rhodes, Henry T.F. The Satanic Mass. Apr. An Touch-Screens, 3-D-Modellen und Panoramaansichten und Interaktionsflächen taucht der Gast in die Geschichte des Welterbes in. Wir wünschen Ihnen viel Spaß beim Stöbern im Programm der Verlage Butzon & Bercker Mehr Details · E-Book · Geschenkbücher · Gotteslob · Kalender. The year is and the world has gone to hell. There was a problem loading comments right now. In chapter one our protagonist Professor Eugene Meyers, who teaches creative writing at the local University, inadvertently discovers that his teenage daughter seems to have taken an interest in making internet porn. Baum has a daughter from his first marriage. Some of william hill casino gutschein code characters read it and therefore know how it ends and what happens to themselves even as they play their parts in it like actors in a drama. Paralleling Wunderino.de casino life is President Charles Winchell. I could not force myself through this unappealing and boring book. The first word I think of is "Meta. Amazon Restaurants Food delivery from local restaurants. Not really post-apocalyptic, not really political, more like a subjective best casino buffet in vegas from the point of view of Gene Myers. Want to Read saving…. Henry Baum has excellent company where this is concerned; many bestsellers fall in to this category. Read more Read less. It's post-apocalyptic, pre-apocalyptic, apocalyptic, sci-fi, fantasy, horror, suspense, religious, satire, and a host of other things. Sex is everywhere, with people copulating on prime time television and not a soul cares.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The idea is interesting, a writer's book cones true, and worse he is predicting the apocalypse.

Sadly it is poorly executed, I struggled to like the writer character, there were many inappropriate uses of the word rape, there were no lifelike characters, for example, one character's daughter dies and he seems to care little, has no funeral, etc, just walks away.

The ending is rushed, unearned and uninteresting. Such a waste of time. I really thought I would enjoy this, but it just wasn't The idea is interesting, a writer's book cones true, and worse he is predicting the apocalypse.

I really thought I would enjoy this, but it just wasn't good. May 22, Ron Fritsch rated it it was amazing. As I read Henry Baum's The American Book of the Dead, I couldn't help but wonder if it was science fiction, speculative fiction, fantasy, dystopian fiction, or some other kind of non-realistic fiction.

Early on, the narrator insists it's none of the above. Ultimately, I decided there was no need to answer the question.

For me, the most intriguing characters in this story are Charles Winchell, the President of the United States, his controlling or not father Benjamin, and the President's wife, A As I read Henry Baum's The American Book of the Dead, I couldn't help but wonder if it was science fiction, speculative fiction, fantasy, dystopian fiction, or some other kind of non-realistic fiction.

For me, the most intriguing characters in this story are Charles Winchell, the President of the United States, his controlling or not father Benjamin, and the President's wife, Amy, who more than once refers to her husband as an idiot.

For those of us who lived through the first decade of the 21st century, Charles, Benjamin, and Amy might very well seem to be public figures we already know.

They might also remind those of us who were raised as Christians of the father-and-son-but-really-one contortion at the heart of the religion, as well as the apparent mother and wife of them both.

In any event, this father and son agree, with their secret followers around the world, that the only way to save humanity is to kill off all but a tiny fraction of the human species in a magnificent World War III—in which even England and Canada see fit to drop bombs on America—and to begin civilization anew with the survivors in an area of Los Angeles north of Sunset Boulevard purposefully protected from the ravages of the war.

Charles, though, wishes to go beyond his publicly taking on the role of the Anti-Christ to herald the Second Coming of Christ and start the war.

Charles, defying his father, imagines the roles of the Anti-Christ and the returning Messiah as one. How else can he justify giving the horrific orders to wipe out billions of human beings?

What I especially enjoyed about Baum's novel was the question raised throughout I would've said "on every page" if I hadn't read the digital version as to the reliability of the narrator.

He tells us he's a hopelessly unsuccessful novelist who is writing a novel in that turns out to be the one we're reading, The American Book of the Dead.

The story becomes true as he writes it, almost as if he's a god. And yet, since the past, present, and future are all the same, when the action he's writing about takes place in , he has already finished writing the novel.

Some of the characters read it and therefore know how it ends and what happens to themselves even as they play their parts in it like actors in a drama.

They wisely, though, don't give away the ending to readers such as myself. Baum is delightfully playing with the very idea of telling a story.

Nobody ever told one without pretending to be a god. That's what a god does. Jul 29, Pam rated it it was ok.

I really did have to push myself to finish this book, and when I finally, at long last, got through it, I felt cheated. The ending, in my opinion, jumps the shark.

Basically, this guy, Eugene Myers, writes a book that is somehow published before he finishes it. I didn't like the narrator at all.

He came across as self-serving and egotistical. Oh, and the author needs to go look up the word "evolve" in a dictionary. Any old dictionary will do.

Cause he misused that word pretty much throughout the I really did have to push myself to finish this book, and when I finally, at long last, got through it, I felt cheated.

Cause he misused that word pretty much throughout the book, which I found really irritating. The author has a bad habit of repeating the same ideas ad nauseum using different wording.

Such needless repetition is typical of an author who lacks confidence in their own writing to get the point across the first time or of an author who doesn't believe his audience will understand it the first time around.

Either way, I found it both irritating and frustrating. I'm hard pressed to come up with a single thing I really enjoyed about the book.

Honestly, the only reason I even finished it was because I hate to leave books unfinished you never know -- the ending could be amazing!

But I definitely wish I hadn't read this one to start with, as it was a trite story that didn't offer much in the way of either entertainment or education.

One could argue that there are layers to the book, that it's a look at the impact of religion and politics on the modern world while simultaneously offering a glimpse into the mind of a writer.

I would, however, argue that both of those concepts have been handled much better by other authors many, many times already, and this book brings nothing new to either discussion except maybe, MAYBE, a clearer sense of the megalomania some authors find in their control over the material.

Overall, I really wouldn't recommend this book. It didn't offer me anything entertaining or thought-provoking, and it was more of a slog than anything.

Nov 26, David Major rated it liked it. This book developed and changed as it went on, in ways that kept me thoroughly engaged. Intelligent and thoughtful, while at the same becoming increasingly surreal and worthy of a Dali painting.

SF meets some very strange headspaces here. I like that kind of thing. We start with a father discovering his daughter starring on a porn site, then take off into a political and psychological voyage through a World War started by a fundamentalist president whose father is the archetype of all elitist new This book developed and changed as it went on, in ways that kept me thoroughly engaged.

We start with a father discovering his daughter starring on a porn site, then take off into a political and psychological voyage through a World War started by a fundamentalist president whose father is the archetype of all elitist new-world-order patriachs.

We see the world depopulated by a planned war so it can be saved, and the central character, who is in a very real sense the author of the novel, becomes a central player in the increasingly surreal drama that unfolds.

To help matters along, the novel itself becomes a central part of the plot. I understand that the author has a sequel in the works.

Definitely recommended if you like your SF with a healthy dose of the unusual and bizarre, and frequent allusion to contemporary conspiracy theories.

Read on an iPod Touch, in epub format, in Stanza, which worked just fine. Oct 11, Rachel rated it liked it Shelves: I initially thought I was going to be confused by this book as it was about an author who writes a book about the future and the it turns out the future is how he has written it.

He also starts to dream about people and decides that the messages he receives in the dreams are real and heads off to meet and save these people.

Once I had my head around this the book was good. The book is about a dystopian future with a religiously fanatical President whose aim is to kill off the masses and rise as I initially thought I was going to be confused by this book as it was about an author who writes a book about the future and the it turns out the future is how he has written it.

The book is about a dystopian future with a religiously fanatical President whose aim is to kill off the masses and rise as the new Jesus.

However, things do not turn out as he hopes. There is still the bombing and the killing of the masses but human nature prevailed and people saved themselves.

The writing was simple in places and I often thought it was aimed more towards a young adult market except for some of the more adult references , but it was and enjoyable piece of Sci-fi and would definitely read more by the author.

Aug 08, Todd rated it it was amazing. The beauty of it is, by the time I got to the end, I wanted it to fall. I wanted the apocalypse to happen.

That humanity, when facing the abyss, will awaken to a greater consciousness and progress, rather than destroy itself.

The book gets a little weird toward the end, but given the context, it sort of makes sense in its own strange way.

If I had to sum up the book, and the experience of reading it, I would say Henry Baum made me want the apocalypse to happen, and quickly.

However, I did not want the book to end. May 01, Sift Book Reviews rated it really liked it Shelves: While I appreciated the quality of the writing and the originality of the story, I couldn't really get in to this book.

Don't get me wrong, I can tell that many many others will enjoy The American Book of the Dead immensely, but it's one of those books that just isn't for me.

Henry Baum has excellent company where this is concerned; many bestsellers fall in to this category. I think this book would be perfect for those who enjoy heavily philosophical sci-fi and for those who don't necessarily n While I appreciated the quality of the writing and the originality of the story, I couldn't really get in to this book.

I think this book would be perfect for those who enjoy heavily philosophical sci-fi and for those who don't necessarily need to love the hero of the story Right or wrong, I do.

See the entire review at Sift: This has, in no way, affected the reviewer's opinion. What an odd book to review! This is actually a completely insane story.

I don't really know how to define it. It skips from subject to subject until we get a feeling we know what the main plot is.

Then it just starts all over again. Some parts were nice and you have this urge to know more about all the nonsense that is going on. But there are parts that are a bit boring and just "more of the same".

Anyway, I What an odd book to review! Anyway, I'm glad I read it cause I do like to read a completely different story once in a while.

But I probably wouldn't be much interested in reading a sequel and I know the author is writing a second book. May 18, Alex rated it liked it.

Henry Baum, who nests more than a few matryoshka dolls inside the concept, pulls it off mostly, in this cleverly plotted, and at times demanding, book.

Aug 17, John Plunkett rated it did not like it. Book started off very promising with interesting premise - a writer writing about the apocalypse as if it has already happened although he is actually writing it in advance.

About a third of the way through it degenerates badly as the author seems to be in an incredible rush to get things done. The author also gets away from scenes and starts explaining everything instead.

Sep 28, Paul rated it liked it. It's an interesting idea - a guy in writing a book about his future self who is writing the same book. There are a few twists and turns along the way like this which are pretty original and surprising.

However, the rest of the book is just OK - the plot is a bit predictable in parts and the ending was quite weak. It was pleasant enough to read if you're happy to suspend disbelief and put up with some weak narrative, just not as well executed as I think the central premise deserved to be.

Aug 08, Joel Tumes rated it liked it. The next American president is the anti-christ and will destroy the world but you already knew that right? An eschatalogical tale of the apocalypse, drawing on the fringe beliefs of end-of-days cults and conspiracy theorists and presented as prophetic metafiction.

If that piques your interest at all, as a bonus it's distributed for free on the internet legally I mean. Henry Baum Average rating: Want to Read saving….

Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Kristopher Young Goodreads Author. A Week to Go. New song from me: Published on February 28, Oct 21, Henry is now following.

The Ghosts of Gray Fable. Aug 10, Henry rated a book it was amazing. Aug 09, This page works best with JavaScript.

Disabling it will result in some disabled or missing features. You can still see all customer reviews for the product. You see, he contacted me early last year about his book, thinking that it might be something that I would enjoy.

I agreed to review the book, but told him that our first child was due soon and that it might be a while before I got to the book. Undeterred, he went on and mailed me a signed copy, scribbling a note on a card wishing me the best of luck with my soon-to-be daughter and that there was "no rush.

Finally, at the end of March, I picked up Mr. I vaguely remembered that the book was some sort of apocalyptic tale about a struggling author and some strange happenings.

As long as it took me to start the book, had I known that I would finish it so quickly I would have started much sooner. It's an easy enough read to finish in a long afternoon sitting, if you're so inclined, as the book weighs in at just shy of pages.

It is difficult to describe The American Book of the Dead. The first word I think of is "Meta. It's post-apocalyptic, pre-apocalyptic, apocalyptic, sci-fi, fantasy, horror, suspense, religious, satire, and a host of other things.

It reminded me a lot of Kurt Vonnegut, though maybe not as deep, nor as funny. A blurb on the book says it's very much like Philip K.

Dick, too, though I've not read any of his stuff, so I cannot attest to that. Eugene Myers is a struggling writer in his 50s.

He's making do by teaching a class at a local college. He's bored and depressed and his wife doesn't really love him and he doesn't necessarily love her back.

The year is and the world has gone to hell. Random acts of violence are the norm, and there's little to be done about them. Sex is everywhere, with people copulating on prime time television and not a soul cares.

All around him Eugene sees his world and its problems and he writes about his lifeless marriage and whatever he can think of.

One afternoon he discovers an online sex video of his daughter. This straw breaks the camel's back, so to speak, and it begins the strange journey of Eugene Myers.

Paralleling Eugene's life is President Charles Winchell. Charles is a Christian Extremist who is bent on destroying the world so that he can rebuild it and enjoy the peace that is prophesied in the book of Revelation.

Charles won his presidency on promises that he would save the world, and that's exactly what he intends to do.

The man quotes scripture and takes the bible's words a fair bit out of context. That would be The American Book of the Dead in a nutshell.

Baum's writing is smooth and engaging. His story is thought-provoking and provocative. I felt the message was rather heavy handed at times and possibly fueled by conspiracy theories, but never downright offensive.

The book progressively grew more surreal, to its advantage, and I never once got bored with the story. However, for all its praise, the tone of the novel was rather matter-of-fact, which took away a lot of the suspense.

I'm not saying that there was no suspense, because there was, but I think there could have been more. Henry Baum's book provided a surreal reading experience, as many things that jump into the Meta tend to do.

However, by and large, I think Baum kept a deft hand on the plot, driving it forward with building momentum.

Personally I would have enjoyed seeing more of the world and more of its characters, especially in the latter part of the novel.

Instead, The American Book of the Dead is a tight, character-centered book that has some urgency in its message. Because Baum's frightening future is something that could easily happen, barring the magical-like things that happen.

If you're in a reading slump and curious to try something bizarre, check out The American Book of the Dead. Even though I would have liked more development with some of the characters and settings, it still was a fun romp through genre-defying madness.

And if you've read and enjoyed some Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Five particularly comes to mind , you should definitely give this a try.

I received this book for free from Mr Henry Baum himself. Not in person, mind you, but through a machine of different people it did eventually arrive at my house, autographed and lustrous.

Mr Baum did not hypnotize me and force me to write a flattering or positive review, and the opinions reflected here are solely my own.

Furthermore, Mr Baum did not include any sort of cookies with my book, so I was under no Cookie Clause, either. Top rated Most recent Top rated.

All reviewers Verified purchase only All reviewers All stars 5 star only 4 star only 3 star only 2 star only 1 star only All positive All critical All stars All formats Format: Paperback All formats Text, image, video Image and video reviews only Text, image, video.

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. There was a problem loading comments right now.

I struggled with determining how many stars to give this book.

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HOLD THE LINE ÜBERSETZUNG Knox Overstreet Paypal sicher? Hansen: The early Karen Pelletier novels Quieter Than Sleep, The Northbury Papers, and The Raven and the Nightingale were entertaining enough, if mostly implausible and somewhat predictable as most mysteries featuring female English professors are, with the notable exception of the early Amanda Cross efforts. Sixty Years of Indian Finance. We see the continued trikot real madrid kinder of Caprice's sister Bella and her relationship with her husband now that he knows she's pregnant as well as Caprice's own issues with her relationship with Dr. Suchen Kasse Konto Händler Anmelden. Notwendige Cookies helfen dabei, eine Webseite nutzbar zu machen, indem sie Grundfunktionen wie Seitennavigation online depots Zugriff auf sichere Bereiche der Webseite ermöglichen. The Biography of a Phenomenon.
Let me be clear: Audio books will count equivalent pages as regular books. Some people stock up on tuna and canned vegetables. Aug 21, , Her daughter Victoria was married to the Prince of Prussia one of the German states but because of her strong English tendencies, she was never really accepted and her son, Wilhelm, the future Kaiser of Germany was adamantly opposed to whatever his mother wanted. Nearly three hundred pages? A fun mystery - good thing I'm just eating cupcakes in my mind! In Flanders fields the poppies blow - HISTORIES In the mid to late 19th century, it was thought that if a royal marriage was made between countries, that alliances would be forged and the European continent would be at peace. Jul 16, , 5: Good Night Sweet Prince. Trying to figure out what happened and why her friend contacted her, Lucie is ensnared in a mystery that could be deadly for her as well. When he finally came to throne, his relationship with his cousin Wilhelm was troubled.

The American Book Of The Dead Henry Baum Video

Oscar Caliber Gun - Henry Baum Book Trailer

baum book the dead henry american the of -

Juni Premiere feierte. The Patchwork Girl of Oz pgs. I'm now ready for my mini Challenge - hope you all will visit me there! She crafts quality prose and develops memorable characters. Lost Princess of Oz 96 pgs. There were also stories of the twins of Apollo and Artemis and how Athena was born from Zeus' head, Aphrodite's marriage to Hephaestus, Hera's jealous reactions, and how Hermes acquired is miraculous shoes. For me, it was also a weird-but-neat complement to Charles and Emma see above. Only one question wrong!

The american book of the dead henry baum -

Can't figure out what the big hoopla was all about but I can tell you that I won't be going to see the movie when it's made. Give me your hands, if we be friends, And Robin shall restore amends. Bookshelf Bootie - I'm trying to remind myself that when books come into to my house they need to be read soon. The Origin of Species. Do I need a note here to remind folks that reading aloud from old family favorites is a good — nay, a grand idea, no matter how old the kids are? Cry the Beloved Country.

I'm not saying that there was no suspense, because there was, but I think there could have been more. Henry Baum's book provided a surreal reading experience, as many things that jump into the Meta tend to do.

However, by and large, I think Baum kept a deft hand on the plot, driving it forward with building momentum. Personally I would have enjoyed seeing more of the world and more of its characters, especially in the latter part of the novel.

Instead, The American Book of the Dead is a tight, character-centered book that has some urgency in its message. Because Baum's frightening future is something that could easily happen, barring the magical-like things that happen.

If you're in a reading slump and curious to try something bizarre, check out The American Book of the Dead.

Even though I would have liked more development with some of the characters and settings, it still was a fun romp through genre-defying madness.

And if you've read and enjoyed some Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Five particularly comes to mind , you should definitely give this a try.

I received this book for free from Mr Henry Baum himself. Not in person, mind you, but through a machine of different people it did eventually arrive at my house, autographed and lustrous.

Mr Baum did not hypnotize me and force me to write a flattering or positive review, and the opinions reflected here are solely my own.

Furthermore, Mr Baum did not include any sort of cookies with my book, so I was under no Cookie Clause, either. Top rated Most recent Top rated.

All reviewers Verified purchase only All reviewers All stars 5 star only 4 star only 3 star only 2 star only 1 star only All positive All critical All stars All formats Format: Paperback All formats Text, image, video Image and video reviews only Text, image, video.

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. There was a problem loading comments right now.

I struggled with determining how many stars to give this book. I enjoyed reading it a great deal, but also felt it had some deep flaws.

The enjoyment tipped me into the four star range. The simplest way to put it is that this is a novel telling the story of a man living in the events he wrote about in - only he doesn't remember writing them.

The overlapping nature of the narrative isn't nearly the problem you'd think it would be. Baum is a clear writer and he makes the internal life of Gene Myers vivid.

Unfortunately, it's really the only thing that I found vivid and realistic in the story, almost like a diamond had been mounted on a cardboard ring.

A Christian fundamentalist president, backed by his father and a mysterious cabal of global playmakers, decides the best way to fix the earth's problems is to wipe out virtually everybody and start over.

While the cabal plans to reveal the reality of aliens and various reptilian overlord-type conspiracies post-apocalypse, President Winchell plans to rule as the incarnation of Jesus Christ.

The supposedly violent and amoral world of is supposed to make people more amenable to the early part of this plan, but other than referring to public shootings and a pornographic primetime network show, the world Baum describes isn't that much different from our own.

It's just kind of. The president and those surrounding him are caricatures of fundamentalists. I was utterly unconvinced that these people would agree to cause the deaths of most of the people on the planet.

The ending was very disappointing to me also. Not really post-apocalyptic, not really political, more like a subjective tale from the point of view of Gene Myers.

I really enjoyed reading this book. It's still free and I recommend it to you too. The flaws are more apparent because the author reached for so much, which is a welcome relief from authors reaching for too little.

If this book had made the future horrors more palpable, if the political situation had been more plausible, the political antagonists drawn more carefully, this could have been a great book.

I look forward to reading more from this author in the future. I mean, a good book is one thing. I got through the Lord of the Rings trilogy in a fair bit of time.

That's some dense writing, a lot of exposition, description, elaboration. Translations of invented languages, whatever. Took me a few weeks for several thousand more words.

The American Book of the Dead reads like a vital sign. I bought it too, in another format, then, quite a bit later, when money was available, bought the dead tree version.

This is a book filled with urgency. It is not simply sci-fi or fantasy. It's true to life confusion and an apt descriptor of America. We, as a whole, fail to pay attention to the travesties that are highlighted here, ignore the dual-edged sword our freedom has us hanging over, despise each other over hastily drawn imaginary lines we've been taught to see.

Conservatives and liberals hashing things out in a ring that just doesn't even make sense. Eugene Myers doesn't try to make sense of it.

He rolls with it. He winds up in the hospital after the worst thing a dad can imagine. Things only go downhill from there, on one hand, but on the other hand, things only get better.

In any event, this father and son agree, with their secret followers around the world, that the only way to save humanity is to kill off all but a tiny fraction of the human species in a magnificent World War III—in which even England and Canada see fit to drop bombs on America—and to begin civilization anew with the survivors in an area of Los Angeles north of Sunset Boulevard purposefully protected from the ravages of the war.

Charles, though, wishes to go beyond his publicly taking on the role of the Anti-Christ to herald the Second Coming of Christ and start the war.

Charles, defying his father, imagines the roles of the Anti-Christ and the returning Messiah as one. How else can he justify giving the horrific orders to wipe out billions of human beings?

What I especially enjoyed about Baum's novel was the question raised throughout I would've said "on every page" if I hadn't read the digital version as to the reliability of the narrator.

He tells us he's a hopelessly unsuccessful novelist who is writing a novel in that turns out to be the one we're reading, The American Book of the Dead.

The story becomes true as he writes it, almost as if he's a god. And yet, since the past, present, and future are all the same, when the action he's writing about takes place in , he has already finished writing the novel.

Some of the characters read it and therefore know how it ends and what happens to themselves even as they play their parts in it like actors in a drama.

They wisely, though, don't give away the ending to readers such as myself. Baum is delightfully playing with the very idea of telling a story.

Nobody ever told one without pretending to be a god. That's what a god does. Jul 29, Pam rated it it was ok. I really did have to push myself to finish this book, and when I finally, at long last, got through it, I felt cheated.

The ending, in my opinion, jumps the shark. Basically, this guy, Eugene Myers, writes a book that is somehow published before he finishes it.

I didn't like the narrator at all. He came across as self-serving and egotistical. Oh, and the author needs to go look up the word "evolve" in a dictionary.

Any old dictionary will do. Cause he misused that word pretty much throughout the I really did have to push myself to finish this book, and when I finally, at long last, got through it, I felt cheated.

Cause he misused that word pretty much throughout the book, which I found really irritating. The author has a bad habit of repeating the same ideas ad nauseum using different wording.

Such needless repetition is typical of an author who lacks confidence in their own writing to get the point across the first time or of an author who doesn't believe his audience will understand it the first time around.

Either way, I found it both irritating and frustrating. I'm hard pressed to come up with a single thing I really enjoyed about the book.

Honestly, the only reason I even finished it was because I hate to leave books unfinished you never know -- the ending could be amazing!

But I definitely wish I hadn't read this one to start with, as it was a trite story that didn't offer much in the way of either entertainment or education.

One could argue that there are layers to the book, that it's a look at the impact of religion and politics on the modern world while simultaneously offering a glimpse into the mind of a writer.

I would, however, argue that both of those concepts have been handled much better by other authors many, many times already, and this book brings nothing new to either discussion except maybe, MAYBE, a clearer sense of the megalomania some authors find in their control over the material.

Overall, I really wouldn't recommend this book. It didn't offer me anything entertaining or thought-provoking, and it was more of a slog than anything.

Nov 26, David Major rated it liked it. This book developed and changed as it went on, in ways that kept me thoroughly engaged.

Intelligent and thoughtful, while at the same becoming increasingly surreal and worthy of a Dali painting. SF meets some very strange headspaces here.

I like that kind of thing. We start with a father discovering his daughter starring on a porn site, then take off into a political and psychological voyage through a World War started by a fundamentalist president whose father is the archetype of all elitist new This book developed and changed as it went on, in ways that kept me thoroughly engaged.

We start with a father discovering his daughter starring on a porn site, then take off into a political and psychological voyage through a World War started by a fundamentalist president whose father is the archetype of all elitist new-world-order patriachs.

We see the world depopulated by a planned war so it can be saved, and the central character, who is in a very real sense the author of the novel, becomes a central player in the increasingly surreal drama that unfolds.

To help matters along, the novel itself becomes a central part of the plot. I understand that the author has a sequel in the works.

Definitely recommended if you like your SF with a healthy dose of the unusual and bizarre, and frequent allusion to contemporary conspiracy theories.

Read on an iPod Touch, in epub format, in Stanza, which worked just fine. Oct 11, Rachel rated it liked it Shelves: I initially thought I was going to be confused by this book as it was about an author who writes a book about the future and the it turns out the future is how he has written it.

He also starts to dream about people and decides that the messages he receives in the dreams are real and heads off to meet and save these people.

Once I had my head around this the book was good. The book is about a dystopian future with a religiously fanatical President whose aim is to kill off the masses and rise as I initially thought I was going to be confused by this book as it was about an author who writes a book about the future and the it turns out the future is how he has written it.

The book is about a dystopian future with a religiously fanatical President whose aim is to kill off the masses and rise as the new Jesus.

However, things do not turn out as he hopes. There is still the bombing and the killing of the masses but human nature prevailed and people saved themselves.

The writing was simple in places and I often thought it was aimed more towards a young adult market except for some of the more adult references , but it was and enjoyable piece of Sci-fi and would definitely read more by the author.

Aug 08, Todd rated it it was amazing. The beauty of it is, by the time I got to the end, I wanted it to fall. I wanted the apocalypse to happen.

That humanity, when facing the abyss, will awaken to a greater consciousness and progress, rather than destroy itself.

The book gets a little weird toward the end, but given the context, it sort of makes sense in its own strange way. If I had to sum up the book, and the experience of reading it, I would say Henry Baum made me want the apocalypse to happen, and quickly.

However, I did not want the book to end. May 01, Sift Book Reviews rated it really liked it Shelves: While I appreciated the quality of the writing and the originality of the story, I couldn't really get in to this book.

Don't get me wrong, I can tell that many many others will enjoy The American Book of the Dead immensely, but it's one of those books that just isn't for me.

Henry Baum has excellent company where this is concerned; many bestsellers fall in to this category. I think this book would be perfect for those who enjoy heavily philosophical sci-fi and for those who don't necessarily n While I appreciated the quality of the writing and the originality of the story, I couldn't really get in to this book.

I think this book would be perfect for those who enjoy heavily philosophical sci-fi and for those who don't necessarily need to love the hero of the story Right or wrong, I do.

See the entire review at Sift: This has, in no way, affected the reviewer's opinion. What an odd book to review! This is actually a completely insane story.

I don't really know how to define it. It skips from subject to subject until we get a feeling we know what the main plot is. Then it just starts all over again.

Some parts were nice and you have this urge to know more about all the nonsense that is going on.

But there are parts that are a bit boring and just "more of the same". Anyway, I What an odd book to review! Anyway, I'm glad I read it cause I do like to read a completely different story once in a while.

But I probably wouldn't be much interested in reading a sequel and I know the author is writing a second book. May 18, Alex rated it liked it.

Henry Baum, who nests more than a few matryoshka dolls inside the concept, pulls it off mostly, in this cleverly plotted, and at times demanding, book.

Aug 17, John Plunkett rated it did not like it. Book started off very promising with interesting premise - a writer writing about the apocalypse as if it has already happened although he is actually writing it in advance.

About a third of the way through it degenerates badly as the author seems to be in an incredible rush to get things done.

The author also gets away from scenes and starts explaining everything instead. Sep 28, Paul rated it liked it. It's an interesting idea - a guy in writing a book about his future self who is writing the same book.

There are a few twists and turns along the way like this which are pretty original and surprising. However, the rest of the book is just OK - the plot is a bit predictable in parts and the ending was quite weak.

It was pleasant enough to read if you're happy to suspend disbelief and put up with some weak narrative, just not as well executed as I think the central premise deserved to be.

Aug 08, Joel Tumes rated it liked it. The next American president is the anti-christ and will destroy the world but you already knew that right?

An eschatalogical tale of the apocalypse, drawing on the fringe beliefs of end-of-days cults and conspiracy theorists and presented as prophetic metafiction.

If that piques your interest at all, as a bonus it's distributed for free on the internet legally I mean.

Es un libro raro, muy raro. Jan 27, Jessie Verino rated it it was ok. I received this free from a Kindle promotion.

The concept is intriguing. Even with all the "action" in this story, it all felt bland. Like I was an observer, being prevented from immersing myself in the story, just like the narrator.

The ending only accentuates this. I didn't dislike the story, but I can't say that I liked it, either. Dec 01, Pangs rated it liked it.

An interesting take on the end of world scenario. It started slow for me, but I found myself enjoying it more than I thought I would.

I would rate the book better were it not for the ending. I didn't appreciate the conclusion at all. It lacked substance and I felt like the story fizzled to a conclusion.

I could not force myself through this unappealing and boring book. Sometimes if I stick with a book it gets better as it goes on, but in this case I gradually came to dislike the narrator so much that it was impossible to continue.

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